September 2016 - Northwest Pain Relief Centers

Monthly Archives: September 2016

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Guide to Cold Laser Therapy and Its Many Health Benefits

Cold laser therapy, or low level laser therapy, is a treatment in which a cold laser is used to treat acute and chronic pain. It is also called a “soft laser.” If you suffer from back pain, joint pain, tendonitis, fibromyalgia, migraine headaches, neuropathy, neck pain, or other related health conditions, cold laser therapy might be a viable solution for you.

How it Works

Cold laser therapy works by increasing the levels of serotonin to help your body heal itself. The therapy is noninvasive and non-thermal. The cold laser was derived from phototherapy, a light healing method developed more than 30 years ago. In phototherapy, a special type of light penetrates the surface of the skin as well as underlying tissues to stimulate natural healing in the body. The low level laser light used in cold laser therapy is actually the compressed light of a wavelength from the red part of the light spectrum, or the cold part.

During the cold laser process, the body’s cells are exposed to photon energy, which in turn increases the cells’ metabolism, helps to develop muscle tissue and collagen, improves blood circulation, stimulates tissue repair and the healing of wounds, and stimulates the nervous and immune systems.

Cold lasers are also used in acupuncture to stimulate the acupoints of the body without using needles.

Using Healing Lasers

You can use healing lasers at home. Some lasers require training while others are fairly simple to use. The simpler models are designed so you can hold the laser near your body in the area where treatment is needed without discomfort. The laser does the work for you. The lasers also have different modes to help with certain needs. If you are considering cold laser treatments, consult with your doctor first.

With cold laser therapy, you can aid your body in healing using a natural, effective method. Keep this guide handy while seeking the cold laser products that are right for you.


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Does Chiropractic Care Really Make Sense?

The Role of Chiropractic in Treatment Beyond the Resolution of Symptoms.

Do you have the same nagging injury that never seems to go away? Are you suffering needlessly with pain? Are you fed up with taking painkillers? Do you want to find out what is causing your pain? If your answer is ‘yes’ to any of these questions, then chiropractic may be a solution for you.

Typically, the chiropractic patient enters the office with some kind of pain. Back pain, neck pain, hip pain, leg pain, arm pain, shoulder pain, etc. comes in all different shapes and sizes. However, all of these pains share one common thread, they are all symptoms. Symptoms tell you that something in your body has gone wrong. They serve as a warning system to alert you of a deeper problem. Healing occurs regardless of the symptom/s experienced. The quality of healing depends on the effectiveness of locating and addressing the cause.

Many people in today’s society experience pain due to abnormal structure of the neuromusculoskeletal system. The neuromusculoskeletal system comprises the human frame and posture. Abnormal postural structure not only predisposes the human body’s systems to abnormal function, but may ultimately result in an injury or chronic condition.

Altered alignment of the human frame may lead to poor healing and repair of the body tissues. These architectural and pathological changes may occur in muscle, ligament, bone and central/peripheral nervous system. Chiropractic aims at therapeutically restoring these pathological deformations of the neuromusculoskeletal system and spine to allow for optimum function of the human frame and nervous system.

Correct spinal mechanics and the health of the whole neuromusculoskeletal system are interdependent. Therefore, chiropractic treatment focuses on restoring proper spinal mechanics which will, in turn, influence the function of the nervous system.

Chiropractic rehabilitation enhances the healing process and assists the body in its efforts to heal itself by controlling the long-term degenerative changes in the human frame and posture. Care is based upon the human process of healing. The healing process is categorized into fairly distinct progressive stages. Consequently, conservative chiropractic rehabilitative care flows with these stages. It is not the intention of this article to provide an in-depth review of rehabilitative chiropractic care and/or the healing process; rather, the purpose is to highlight some of the pertinent concepts in understanding how one can achieve better health through chiropractic care.

Acute inflammatory stage. This initial stage of response to injury lasts up to 72 hours. The goals of care during this phase of healing are directed at reducing the reactive inflammatory response and eventual removal of debris from the tissues. Clinical management includes the use of chiropractic adjustments, ice, heat, gentle range of motion exercises, and passive stretching.

Repair stage. The repair stage lasts from 72 hr. up to 6 wk. and is characterized by the synthesis and deposition of collagen (scar formation) in an attempt to regenerate damaged tissue. During this stage the body’s main concern is the increase of the quantity of collagen to replaced damaged tissue. However, this new scar formation is not fully oriented in the right direction and is of a mechanically inferior quality. Clinical goals during this phase include freeing early adhesions and maintaining muscular tone and ligamentous integrity.

Remodeling stage. This stage lasts from 3 wk. to 12 months or more (depending on the severity of the injury), during which time the collagen scar is remodeled to increase the function of the new tissue. The rehabilitative goals primarily involve improving the quality, orientation and strength of the collagen. This is accomplished by alignment of global body positions and posture, increasing functional capacity, reducing stress/strain on involved injured structures, and management of disability.

So, when does the healing occur? It starts immediately after the injury and can last for over a year depending on the severity of the injury and the action steps taken to help the body heal efficiently. Addressing an injury as early as possible using chiropractic care can result in the best possible scenario of full recovery. Addressing your chronic injuries now results in the return of a pain free lifestyle, doing all the things you love to do.


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Does Massage Therapy Help Against Back Pain?

I originally thought that massage therapy would be a gentle, soothing massage that would lessen the ever present tightness in my shoulders and lower back. Boy was I wrong.

I made an appointment at the insistence of my boss because the neck pain I had experienced since adolescence was becoming more intense from the way I sat at my computer.

I was led into a pastel room with soft lighting and asked to strip to my underwear and lay face down on the table. My head went into a donut shaped holder and there was a place to rest my arms. The massage therapist came in and asked me some questions about the location of my pain and then went to work.

It was the most excruciating pain I had ever felt.

Deep tissue massage is used for breaking up the tightness in the muscle tissue and retraining the muscles. Although the first few sessions seemed to hurt more than they helped, I stuck with it, coming three times a week for a month. By the end of the second month I had begun to look forward to each session and noticed that I wasn’t clenching my jaw as much. I also noticed that my lower back didn’t hurt as much at the end of the day.

The therapist had given me several back stretching exercises to do at night and the results were amazing. I now refer all of my friends with muscle pain for massage therapy.

Massage works the soft tissue-muscles, ligaments and tendons-to stimulate circulation and improve muscle tone. It is a system of kneading and pressing on specific muscle bundles just underneath the skin, but a good massage therapist can reach deeper muscles. Massage is and ancient and simple form of therapy.

Another benefit is improved breathing and circulation. Because the lymphatic system runs parallel to the circulatory system, there is improved elimination of waste throughout the body, and in order to experience the full benefits the client is taught how to breathe deeply and slowly. While the few initial visits were quite uncomfortable, the full result was entirely relaxing.

An occasional soft massage is so relaxing that many people fall asleep during the treatment.

However, if you have pain like mine a course of several treatments will result in the full benefit, such as along with increased circulation and improved breathing, a relaxed muscle is a good way to prevent sprains and torn ligaments, especially if you are an athlete. ( I am far from being an athlete, but am just as prone to injury from excess tension and structural weakness.)

For example, when the structure in my lower back is compromised due to inactivity, I am much more likely to strain my back when I lift heavy objects, even though I am aware of how to properly lift a box-with your knees, not with your back- but because my legs and lower back are weak, massage can greatly improve the position of the muscles and makes them more pliable, thus resulting in less chance of sprain or strain.

Massage is also used to relieve fatigue, which can be caused from the muscles in the body being so tight that you use extra energy to function. Because massage relaxes the muscles, the entire body doesn’t have to work so hard and what was once fatigue can now be energy directed elsewhere.

One last note on the benefits of massage-the use of massage oils help lessen the friction of massage on dry skin, and are often used as an aromatherapy along with the massage process. A good, clean essential oil such as rosemary can leave the client feeling relaxed and calm, so don’t hesitate to ask your therapist to use scented oil.


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Chronic Pain Relief: An Overview

Everyone will experience pain at some point in their lives. Pain is a necessary form of protection against injuries, diseases, or conditions that would otherwise impair or even kill us. Pain alerts us that something is wrong. Pain can be either ‘acute’ or ‘chronic’ – the distinguishing characteristic between the two is their duration.

Acute pain usually occurs after a specific injury. It appears quickly and is usually very intense – one example is the pain of a broken bone. It subsides fairly quickly, particularly after treatment. Chronic pain, on the other hand, seems to build up over time, and often cannot be connected to a particular injury or condition. What chronic pain lasts in intensity, it makes up for in duration – sometimes persisting for decades. Living with constant pain can be unbearable, and many forms of treatment attempt to offer sufferers some sort of chronic pain relief.

One of the most commonly prescribed therapy for chronic pain is medication, both prescription and over-the-counter. While often effective in alleviating pain, these are eschewed by some because of their adverse side effects, which include nausea, dizziness, and fatigue. Others are in search of a more natural form of chronic pain relief.

Exercise, stretching and physical therapy reduce chronic joint pain and muscle soreness and spasms by increasing strength, tone, and flexibility. Exercise increases blood flow, eases joint stiffness, aids in weight loss, and counteracts the stress, anxiety, and depression that often comes from living with chronic pain.

Chiropractic, acupuncture and massage offer three alternative methods of chronic pain relief. Though their methods differ, all of these have helped sufferers manage chronic pain.

In the past few years, researchers have begun to turn their focus on the real source of pain – the brain. Although an injury or wound may lie elsewhere on the body, signals of pain are intercepted, processed, and quite literally ‘felt’ by the brain. Research findings indicate that a multidisciplinary approach to treating chronic pain – one that incorporates psychological as well as physical therapy – provides the most chronic pain relief. Yoga, meditation, and even laughing clinics have proved effective treatments.


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Hair Loss Stem Cell Therapy: A New Technique

Since 1990s stem cells are used in many treatments. Nowadays for hair regeneration, hair loss stem cell therapy is proving to be a good technique.

First of all we need to know what stem cell is. Stem cells are the first building blocks of our body. We all started as a stem cell and then subsequently divided into millions of cells as we grew over time. Then a reverse process of decreasing stem cells starts, as we get older. The process gets faster if we suffer from diseases like heart attack, stroke, cancer, diabetes etc.

In stem cell therapy, stem cells are used as a replacement of damaged or dead cells in the body. On the scalp dead cells don’t grow hair and the area becomes bare, which we call bald. Now if we replace the dead cells on the scalp with new ones through stem cell therapy then the bald spot can be transformed into an area full of hair. This is the basic premise of stem cell therapy for treating baldness. After using this therapy to treat baldness, particularly male pattern baldness, some have experienced good results and some have not had good results. The research is still on and hopefully the success rate will improve in the coming years.

In the scientific lab, stem cells are produced and then these cells are injected in the bald areas of the scalp. If the first attempt to generate hair does not work then the doctors try again but the result is not guaranteed as the process is at an initial stage. If you want to try stem cell therapy for hair loss you can contact a dermatologist for the purpose.


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